Saturday, 15 September 2012

Agidi jollof

The very first time I heard “Agidi jollof” was at a friend’s place. Her mum had just finished preparing lunch and when it was time to eat, I was like “Choi!!! Naija people don come again with their potty :s…which one come be "agidi jollof" again na!?(In my mind though…hehehe!!!!)”.
The sight looked appetizing but since that was my very first time at my friend’s place and I had taken a glass of juice earlier on, i didn't want to look like a "gluttonomo"(you know the normal procedure na! babe suppose form small ;) ) I had to bring up the “I’m not hungry excuse” while deep inside my tummy was making funny “cranky” noises (Mehnn!!! The babe never chop since morning…Infact! Hunger dey almost Scatter my belle for there). As a typical naija woman, the mum pleaded and pleaded to the extent that I had to form “Okay ma! Lemme take it home”.
Immediately I got home, I dug into the food (No time) and I must confess, it blew my mind away. I really didn’t expect it to taste that good. After washing the sumptuous meal down with a cold glass of water, I called up my friend to thank her mum and ask for the recipe which she sent immediately. Since then, No week passed without me eating "agidi jollof" and today, I’ve decided to share the recipe with you….enjoy abeg! You can even send me a picture when you make it so I can upload here aii’…..gracias!

Ingredients:::
2 small heaps of soft Marrow bones or meat, diced
2 cooking spoons white corn starch (pap/akamu)
2 medium sized fresh tomatoes
2 medium sized red scotch bonnet pepper
2 medium sized tatashe (Red bell pepper)
1 medium sized onion (Chopped)
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
Seasoning (maggi/knorr)
Salt to taste

Procedure:::
1. Wash and Blend the tomatoes  pepper/tatashe and some chopped onions into a puree then set aside

2. Wash the soft bones or meat and season with salt, maggi/knorr, chopped onions, water then boil till the bones get very soft


3. Heat the vegetable oil for a few minutes then fry the tomato puree for about 3 mins.

4. Add the soft bones including the stock into the fried tomato puree with a little more water and leave to boil.


5. Make a paste of the Corn starch and at low heat pour into the tomato puree mixture while stirring consistently


6. Increase the heat to medium and watch the tomato/starch mixture thicken.


7. Once it has thickened like pap, turn off the burner and allow to cool a little

8. Scoop the mixture into the washed broad leaves, wrap and leave to cool further and set.



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42 comments:

  1. Anonymous12:06 am

    Luvly! i would definitely try it out.

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  2. Never seen or heard this before. Worth a try

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    Replies
    1. it sure is...thanks toin

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  3. Anonymous7:51 pm

    Wow! Luv 2 try mai hand on dis but wait a minute....what do u mean by heaps of bones? Waiting pls!

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    Replies
    1. you'd definitely thank me a milli once u try it out Anon...hehehehe!!!!. Heaps of soft bones are Marrow bones usually sold in the local markets especially in nigeria. It's chewy and juicy when cooked. Mostly, they are sold separately and Usually heaped in small portions by the beef meat sellers and they are quite different from the popular biscuit bone.

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  4. Hello Dobby,
    where can one find broad leaves and bone marrow in the US. I made white agidi (wrapped in plantain leaves) today with corn starch, it does not taste anything close to the kind of agidi in Nigeria. However this your agidi jollof is mind-blowing. I will definitely try it, but would prefer kind of corn that would give the same taste as Nigerian's agidi.

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  5. Awww!! thanks for the compliments.To get the same Nigerian agidi taste, i'm afraid you might have to make the starch(Pap) from scratch.Here's the link>>>(http://dobbyssignature.blogspot.com/2012/08/how-to-make-pap-ekoakamuogi-from-scratch.html?showComment=1358865355123#c2284868724300228612). Pre-packed Powdered corn starch makes it taste almost like the real thing but not exactly. I get ingredients like marrow bones and broad leaves such as Akwukwo etere "Thaumatococcus Danielli" in the local Nigerian market.I don't know where the marrow bones are sold in the USA but in nigeria, the meat sellers usually heap them separately for sale to make extra cash for themselves.

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  6. Thanks a lot. Please is Corn starch and Akamu/pap the same?

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    Replies
    1. Corn starch and pap are almost the same but not exactly. Simply put, it is actually the powdered form of unfermented Pap.

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  7. Anonymous9:38 am

    I stumbled across your blog from another blog. Your food pictures just make me hungry. In the event that I don't get the bones, can I use meat and kinna allow it overcook? Secondly, can I use tin foil cups as I live in Liguria, Tuscana...no leaves here. Most Nigerian dishes I prepares, I have to improvise.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Anon! Though the original recipe requires soft marrow bones, Using meat wouldn't be a bad new idea.I'd advise you use foil sheets instead of foil cups.

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  8. Anonymous9:43 am

    Me again...can I use semovita...can't get corn starch here either. Oh Oh, and can I use shrimps or fish in place of the bones? The picture alone has me salivating here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Once again Anon :). Semovita is a big 'No No' when making agidi jellof. Yes you can add Crayfish, fish(shredded) or even shrimps as their different flavors would give it a Unique taste. Why not try making the corn starch from scratch. It's not as difficult as it seems ;)

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  9. I've had agidi jellof on my mind for a while, but I'm definitely making it today, thanks to you :)
    Already called my meat guy for some bones, lol.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I've had agidi jellof on my mind for a while, but I'm definitely making it today, thanks to you :)
    Already called my meat guy for some bones, lol.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good to know you are a fan of Agidi jellof olaedo :D...

      Delete
  11. Anonymous3:54 am

    Hey dobby! Thanks for your recipe. I live in the states so finding the leaves is difficult, Is there something else that I can use apart from the leaves? Thanks

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    Replies
    1. Sure! you can make use of aluminium foil too.

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  12. Anonymous3:10 pm

    Hi, can I use akamu/pap to make this ? And thanks for this recipe !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. White corn starch is white Akamu/pap.

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  13. Queen5:18 pm

    Pls i find it difficult making use of the wrap! Can ‎​u teach me how to wrap it

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Queen, sorry for the late reply. do click on the link above where i wrote (Uma Leaves (Thaumatococcus Daniellii) also called Akwukwo Etere). Hope it helps.

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  14. Nice one Dobs. Though i'm not a fan of agidi, but will try it out.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks nitie :). Do let us know how it goes.

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  15. Anonymous4:57 pm

    Hi dobby. I made one today following a recipe I saw online and it did not come out that good so I came back to look for a more precise direction on how to prepare agidi jellof. I think your blog has a more detailed instruction. Thanks. I will let u know when I get it done. CHY.

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    Replies
    1. Awww!!! Thanks Chy. I'd really appreciate it :)

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  16. I just found out my 8mths old baby likes agidi.I will make dis agidi jollof,he may likes it.

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    Replies
    1. Most children love agidi jollof. He'd definitely like it. Do keep us posted ;)

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  17. Anonymous3:10 pm



    thanks Dobby 4 the guide.
    dis is grt, will try it out 2morrow. hope dis works cos my siblings are salivating already.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. it definitely would :). Do give us a feedback K!

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    2. Anonymous12:10 pm

      Hi Dobby,

      it was an awesome experience.it came out so nice with a small flaw, was a bit soured. guess the pap was not well cooked but we enjoyed it.

      do i ve option of making the pap 1st with hot water and then stir the bone and stew into it? i want to get it 100% right dis weekend as i plan to try again.

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    3. you could make the pap first also but while stirring the stew and bones into it, it should be on the burner and on low heat. it'd still come out great :)

      Delete
  18. Anonymous12:09 am

    Hi dobby,can I use yellow pap?

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  19. Anonymous8:34 am

    thks dobby for this recipe i wil sure try it this weekend, but pls can i make the corn pap myslef. like soaking the corn in water for like 1-2days, grind the corn sive it and get out the pap and use it?

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    Replies
    1. Yes you can Anon. Click HERE to learn how to make corn pap from scratch

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  20. Thelma7:52 am

    Hi Dobby, nice recipe!! I never knew you could use akamu for your agidi. While growing, we did our 'agidi' pap differently by parboiling the corn and then grinding it that same day instead of soaking it for 3days. And this is always made it difficult for me to prepare the agidi these days.
    Knowing that you can use akamu has made it easily for me.... Will try out your recipe this weekend.
    I'm sure my husband will love it!!!

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    Replies
    1. I'm sure he will too :)

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  21. Wow! Thanks a lot. Trying it right away.

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    Replies
    1. Do let us know how it goes

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  22. Do you have a beans moi moi recipe? Couldn't find one in your recipe index.
    Thank you in advance

    ReplyDelete

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