Tuesday, 11 August 2015

Ekana Gowon - Gowon's finger

Let's take a trip down memory lane to a time when women of today were girls and men of today were boys. A time when noodles was non-existent and homemade meals & treats were common. Whenever i think about the good 'ol days, lots of things come to mind. From playing in the sand, to sneaking out to buy forbidden sweet treats such as Baba dudu, Balewa, Coconut candy, Tanfili, Sisi pelebe and definitely Ekana Gowon. I remember buying as much as 10 of this locally made sweet for as low as 1 naira back then. Looking back now, i guess my curiosity was inborn. The history of this sweet is unknown but from what i gathered, it was made popular after the Gowon/Ojukwu biafran war hence the name. It's known by different names such as; hanjin legidi, Ekana dinka, Tsugba dinka (nupe), Ojukwu finger (igbo). What is it called in your native language?


How to make Ekana Gowon
• Prep Time:
10 minutes
• Cook Time:15 minutes
• Total Time: 25 minutes

You'll Need:::
• Small nylons (Type used in tying granulated sugar for sale with a pointed edge)
• Broom sticks or toothpicks

Ingredients:::
• 1 cup Granulated sugar
• 1 cup water

Directions:::
Step 1: The fist step is to prepare the cone. You could use Aluminum foil (cut up into little squares) for this or you could use nylon bags (the type used in tying sugar for sale). Either way, you'd get the desired end product. Set this aside



Step 2: In a small pot, dissolve 1 cup of sugar in 1 cup of water. Place the pot on the burner and heat up on medium heat. Leave it to boil for a while till the sugar starts to caramelize and turn brown. Once you notice this, turn off the burner and leave to cool just a little.

Step 3: This step should be done quickly. Get out your pointed edged nylons or foil and quickly pour in little quantities of the sugar caramel before it hardens in the pot. Add the broom stick handles quickly and hang somewhere to harden. Once it hardens, you can now remove the nylon and enjoy your sweet :D.




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36 comments:

  1. God Pikin6:06 am

    Immediately I saw this, I bursted in to laugh. It brought a whole lot of memories back. Chai! So na sugar and water we dey lick in those days? Godwin... Dobby u are indeed very good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you God pikin :)

      Delete
  2. Anonymous6:34 am

    yeeppaa!!! i remember this thing o! Lmao! Na real jedi jedi.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kai! You just brought back fond memories from growing up. Growing up in lagos was so much fun. Used to call it baba gowon I think. Please teach us how to make "kokoro".

      Delete
    2. Thanks Vivian. You can learn how to make Kokoro HERE

      Delete
  3. Never knew the name is Ekana Gowon, I use to call it stick sweet.
    I remember those days.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's so true. That's another popular name for this sweet.

      Delete
  4. So it was sugar and water? My God!! We ate some things

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. lol! we really did :)

      Delete
  5. hahahahaha so it's just sugar and water! my-oh-my, I never knew!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hehe! Dobby, my food blogger crush, I love that you research the food you post. This one brings back memories of a great childhood, thank you. In Daura we also call it halawar tsinke (candy stick). Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Awww!!! Thanks Ummibee :)

      Delete
  7. I always saw it but was not allowed to buy *sad face* I wish I had had it back then. But this Dobby sha...how in the world did you think up this recipe?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. lol! Now you can make it at home. I guess i'd say years of experimenting when i was much younger.

      Delete
  8. ... we called it licky licky back then in primary school. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i tot licky licky was black velvet tamarind

      Delete
  9. Wow. This makes me remember my primary school days. They were wrapped in brown paper and sometimes I ate bits of brown paper with the sweet 'cos I couldn't peel it off completely. Nice post

    ReplyDelete
  10. ah...dis wan na dysentery o





    Nigerians can be very competitive eh! Even in spiritual things.
    Me: my head day pain me.
    Colleague: your own small, my head, neck, waist, everywhere dey pain me. read
    FELLOW NIGERIANS

    ReplyDelete
  11. Anonymous7:42 pm

    Yayyyyyy!!!! We call it hanjinlegidi... I so much luv it back then.. never knew we were licking just sugar and water Chai! Dobby nyc 1.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Yummy! I remember these.. good ol memorieess

    ReplyDelete
  13. Murna2:42 pm

    Can I do a variation with flavoring n color?

    ReplyDelete
  14. Yeeee dobby I chop wella. But u miss one thing we dey add a dash of lime 4 tingly sour 4 throat back den. We dey call am hanjinligidi

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really? would try that out.

      Delete
  15. Very interesting post.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Ahhh! I remember tis alot. Back in Warri_ where I grew up_ we called it Ojukwu Finger. There was even a story going round then that A took it from B and forgot it in her pocket and so A's mother was washing her uniform and found a human finger in A's pocket intead of the 'Ojukwu Finger' Lol!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. lol! That's hilarious & scary. i heard such stories growing up too.

      Delete
  17. Adewale4:22 am

    like seriously!

    where did you dig this up lady?!

    DAMN!

    I ate it like a zillion times when i was young.

    ekana gowon!

    ReplyDelete
  18. ADENUGA5:09 am

    yes oooo so so lovely

    ReplyDelete

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